Frequently Asked Questions

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FAQ

BOARD SELECTION

Which board should I get?

Deciding on which board is right for you comes down to what kind of riding you want to do. The best rule of thumb is to pick your board according to the length of the wheelbase. The wheelbase, viagra usa  which is measured as the distance between the trucks, plays the most important part in the performance differences between the different models. The shorter the board, the easier it is to pump, while the longer the board the more stability is gains for speed and pushing. The shorter boards have a tighter turn radius and are very agile and so are great for flat land pumping and surfskating. The longer boards are good cruisers and can handle faster surfskating. The second factor is the shape of the template and mold. Spoon nosed models with kicktails are perfect surfskates and cruisers, while the double kick models are great for parks and street/surf hybrids.
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I have been windsurfing for more than 20 yrs and now I started surfing with a longboard and progressevely decreasing size to arrive sooner than later to a shortboard. Based on what I read, your product can create the same fluid dynamic of a surfboard in the water. I’m tall 1,80m and weight 80kgs. I’m 40 yrs old and maybe too old to start !! I would like to increase my ability to turn and pump in the water. I’m not interested in tricks. I would like also to simulate bottum turn and cut back. Which type of board (lenght and material ) do you suggest and which truck (C7 or CX as an example) ? Thank you very much for your suggestions.

Given your story I’d suggest getting one of the medium sized Surfskate series, from the 31″ Knox, Monsta or Resin on the shorter side to the Stack, Kerrlage or USA Resin on the longer side.

Both the CX and C7 trucks will feel like surfing. The C7 is more fluid, like surfing a single fin, while the CX is snappier, like a tri fin thruster. So depending on the feel you want you can select one or the other, but these days it’s been all about the CX for me, as I too only use this for cut backs, pumping, etc.
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I really want one of your boards, I tried one for a few seconds and was hooked. Problem is which one? I want to carve on the flat, without pushing off and head off all over town, as I live in a dead sea side resort in winter. My balance is ok, but I don’t have insurance so, not something that I’ll be falling off of. If looks were anything to go off, I like the mini Simmons, the Egg Beater and also the Green room 34”. This selection is based on looks from your web site. But what is best for me? I’m 6 foot tall and slimish.

Stoked that you’re keeping fit on surf and skate boards!

The shorter boards like the Mini Simms are super fun on flat land, but more for tight carving in like driveway cut outs and shorter distances. For getting around the Greenroom is a better choice, as the extra length and width are good for longer distances and faster riding, while still being short enough to pump continuously. The 36 Venice Pintail is another slightly longer cruiser that I think would suit your riding style.

Can you pump the 36” Venice instead of pushing off? I like the idea of a longer board, but wasn’t sure if I could just pump it all the time, that’s really what I want one for. For the exercise and non-stop ride for 10 minutes at a time. what do you think? Oh sorry to say this, but I prefer the classic graphics, like the Egg Beater, Face Time and Hotdogger. Only a question based on paint job. But how would the Face Time pump continuously without having to push with your foot? The wheel base is much longer I noticed. Or am I barking up the wrong tree? I am asking these questions, so I don’t buy the wrong board.  What I’m looking for is a cool trim, glide and turn, but with the ability to not have to push off with my foot to get drive.

Interestingly, there is a slight advantage to a longer board for faster pumping. If you can imagine that each size is like a gear on a bicycle, the shorter boards are the lower gears and the longer boards are the higher gears. So while they all pump easily due to the trucks, a longer board will reach it’s optimal pump speed at a faster average than a shorter board. Optimal speed is how fast you carve from side to side, so a longer board will go faster at the same rate of pump as a shorter board. That said, the shorter board, like the lower gear on the bike, is easier from a standstill and can maneuver tighter spaces but its top speed is lower.

Okay, so for you I’d say that the Egg Beater is a tight pumper, quick and easy to pump but not as fast; I’m guessing around 10mph, whereas the Facetime has a longer pump, finding its rythym at around 14mph. You can see the differences are small, so you can really dial in the feel you want. Which board did you try? It was likely a shorter board, like a Knox or a Swallow, so that will give you a sense of how a shorter board pumps.

All this said and considering how you will be riding and what you like, I would recommend either the Greenroom or the Facetime for the faster distance riding.

I ordered the Facetime from England, it arrived today, fantastic shape, my friend with years of experience surfing and skating had a ball. I need more practice. I may order a Fort Knox this week too for skate parks and easier pumping. Is this the right board for riding in a skatepark?

Thanks for your stoke, I’m very happy you and your friend are enjoying the board. If you’re getting a board specifically for skateparks might I suggest considering the 36″ Venice Blue?

Comparing the wheelbases between the 38 Facetime (23 1/2″) you got and the 36 Venice Blue (18 1/8″) vs. the 31 Knox (16 3/4″), the Venice Blue has a slightly longer wheelbase; still shorter than your cruiser and easier to pump than the Facetime, but it also has a more similar stance and feel. Plus the nose kick goes a long way to making you feel locked in while up the transition.  Just a thought, as the Knox is a great board too.

Can you pump the 36” Venice instead of pushing off? I like the idea of a longer board, but wasn’t sure if I could just pump it all the time, that’s really what I want one for. For the exercise and non-stop ride for 10 minutes at a time. what do you think? Oh sorry to say this, but I prefer the classic graphics, like the Egg Beater, Face Time and Hotdogger. Only a question based on paint job. But how would the Face Time pump continuously without having to push with your foot? The wheel base is much longer I noticed. Or am I barking up the wrong tree?

I am asking these questions, so I don’t buy the wrong board. What I’m looking for is a cool trim, glide and turn, but with the ability to not have to push off with my foot to get drive.

Interestingly, there is a slight advantage to a longer board for faster pumping. If you can imagine that each size is like a gear on a bicycle, the shorter boards are the lower gears and the longer boards are the higher gears. So while they all pump easily due to the trucks, a longer board will reach it’s optimal pump speed at a faster average than a shorter board. Optimal speed is how fast you carve from side to side, so a longer board will go faster at the same rate of pump as a shorter board. That said, the shorter board, like the lower gear on the bike, is easier from a standstill and can maneuver tighter spaces but its top speed is lower.

Okay, so for you I’d say that the Egg Beater is a tight pumper, quick and easy to pump but not as fast; I’m guessing around 10mph, whereas the Facetime has a longer pump, finding its rythym at around 14mph. You can see the differences are small, so you can really dial in the feel you want. Which board did you try? It was likely a shorter board, like a Knox or a Swallow, so that will give you a sense of how a shorter board pumps.

All this said and considering how you will be riding and what you like, I would recommend either the Greenroom or the Facetime for the faster distance riding.

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I will apologize for the lengthy email ahead of time, but am hopeful you can help me choose the right board.  

I am 6′ / 200 lbs and in my early 40’s.  I typically surf a single fin 8’0 board or a 7′ twin fish.  I would describe my surfing style as flowing, laid back and infrequent.  I have become a weekend warrior with two small kids and not in the water as much as I used to be.

I have recently dusted off and been riding a 50″ longboard to cruise around the neighborhood with my son as he is tearing up the sidewalk on his scooter.  Its great for the boardwalk and going straight, not for cruising the neighborhood or turning.  I am looking for a board to keep up with my son but also help me to improve my surfing skills; I guess a mix between cruising and carving.  I demo’ed the 31″ Resin but it felt too small and a bit squirrelly for cruising/kicking.

Any direction you can offer would be appreciated.

Thanks for the thorough email, it makes it easier to give you a good answer.

It sounds like our 42″ Hotdogger with the CX truck set might be ideal for you. While it’s a long board, with the CX trucks it turns and pumps really well, you’d be surprised. I have a friend who’s also around 200 lbs and after trying the 34 Greenroom and the 36 Pintail he chose the Hotdogger because he was able to push it with confidence and pump it down the road with speed. For you it will feel nimble compared to your 50″ skateboard or your 8′ 0, which is perfect.

BUSHINGS

I love my CX’s in parks and bowls. My back pivot is getting a little squeaky. What kind of lube do you recommend — anything in particular to not break down the urethane?

Yes, sildenafil click I heard that using a petroleum based lubricant will break down the urethane more quickly, generic cialis but I have yet to experience that issue. I use a regular bearing grease in my pivot cups and it works like a charm. I have trucks that are going on 10 years and I don’t see any ‘breakdown’. I’ve done some research and cannot find anything conclusive.

OK, I kind of suspected that myself.

If you are concerned about this you can use a Silicone-based lube, as well as a Teflon based lube, obtained at a bicycle shop. I’ve also heard about using soap shavings, graphite and regular oil, each with it’s own pros and cons.

So, regular grease if you want to stop the squeak easily, specialty lubricant if you want to go out and find the ideal lube and if you research further and discover any new info please let me know!

OK, I’m sure just some regular grease will do the trick.

I’m sure I will eventually break down and try a hard set of these: http://riotboardsports.com/shop/extra-large-universal/

I’ve been riding the CX’s in bowls and steadily loosening them. I just put some Reflex 86A double barrels in front and 86A cones in back. At about 175 pounds I think that’s as soft as I can go! I do like the cones in the rear truck. I like that feeling of digging into the tail.

I’ve not surfed, but you’ve got me working on snap turns and watching surf videos to figure out the mechanics. I don’t think I’ll be going back to standard skateboard trucks.

I went on the Riot site to check out the pivot cups and did not see measurements for the various sizes they offer. I emailed them to request some dimensions to make sure which pivot cups will fit our different models. If you do get a set let me know what you think, otherwise I’ll let you know what I find out.

I have a couple pivots from my Surf-Rodz, which look like they’re the same size as the ones in the CX — standard Randal size.

I have some soft ones in my Ace’s which made a pretty big difference. The Ace’s had particularly sloppy pivots, but with the Riot cups everything feels more in line. That’s a completely different case than a rotating pivot though.

Have you ever tried a delrin or similar hard nylon bushing in your rotating pivots?

I’m not sure which CX you have, the new CX.4 or the previous CX.3… the CX.4 uses a .70″ OD pivot cup, which is the same as Randal, but the CX.3 uses a smaller 5/8″ OD pivot cup.

For the CX.3 a softer cup is good, and for the CX.4 since it has a machined pivot pin will work well with the harder nylon or delrin cup.

fyi: http://www.riptidebushings.com/Longboard-Pivot-Cups-s/1900.htm

The “internally lubricated WFB Urethane” might work particularly well for the pivot… or just be marketing horseshit. ;-)

I have met with Brad Miller from Rip Tide, a very nice guy who seems serious about his product. I don’t doubt he has a good pivot cup, but WFB is his own horseshit lube name, not something that exists beyond his brand. Another one of my peevs is that he does not provide any dimensions for his cups, so it’s impossible to find one to fit unless you’re on his truck list.

If you do end up contacting him to purchase a set of pivot cups from him please let me know which one fits our CX and C2 trucks. Our pivot cup for those models is .70″ OD x 1/2″ ID x .585″ Tall from end to end.

lol. I’ll let you know. Regardless of what it is made out of, do you think a tube pivot bushing would work in the CX.4, assuming it was the right size otherwise? Did you try that?

I did get the local bike shop to flow me a little baggie of whatever synthetic grease they use, and my pivots are back to smooth and silent. Reflex (kingpin) bushings are working well.

Let me know what the OD and ID of your pivot cups and bushings are and I’ll let you know AND add the trucks to my list.

We have 2 pivot cups we use:

1. For C7.3, C7.4, C2.3, CX.3 we use a .5625″ (5/8″) OD x .4375″ (7/16″) ID x .525″ tall

2. For CX.4, C2.4, CV Drop Up, CV Top Mount we use a .70″ OD x .50″ (1/2″) ID x .60″ tall

For bushings, if you want to include those too:

New for 2013:

1. CV Top Mount and CV Drop Up we use a .65″ bottom barrel 89a and a .55″ top barrel 89a.

2. For CX.4 we use a .65″ bottom conical 89a and a .55″ top conical 89a.

3. For C2.4 we use a .65″ bottom barrel 89a and a .55″ top conical 89a

4. For C7.4 we use a .55″ bottom barrel 95a and a .375″ top conical 95a

Previous models prior to 2012:

1. For C2.3 we use a .55″ bottom conical 89a and a .50″ top conical 89a

2. For CX.3 we use a .55″ bottom conical 89a and .55″ top conical 89a

3. For C7.3 we use a .55″ bottom conical 95a and a top conical 95a.

Obviously the durometers and the conical/barrel selection is what we chose for stock set up, but if someone is looking for a modification they may want to just go by the height and change the durometer and shape to suit their specific needs. For example, we sometimes use a .55″ top conical 89a in the CV if we want it looser, and we sometimes use a .65″ bottom conical 89a for the C2 if we want it looser.

I still think it would be helpful to include detailed specs on each of your parts so when you don’t have the truck model listed a rider can measure their truck and figure out what’ll fit.

C7 vs CX TRUCK

What’s the difference between the C7 and the CX?

The C7 is our signature surfskate front truck, viagra sale and it has an incredible amount of pump and turning radius. It has a spring loaded swing arm that allows the nose of the board to sway slightly from side to side, viagra sale essentially allowing you to snap your turns from the tail and pump effortlessly for speed.

The CX is our reverse-kingpin surfskate front truck, and it also has more pump and tighter turning than any other reverse kingpin truck on the market, but without any other parts. It has a similar feel to the C7 but is less extreme, so if you want a more familiar feel to your board but want to pump and surf, then the CX is the truck you want.

I was wondering what kind of truck system comes with your long boards – I have the monsta carver, love it and am looking to get a long board as well is the truck system the same or similar?

We make the Monsta, so you can get the same trucks depending on which one you have and if you want to try another system we make. We have 2 truck systems that surf; the C7 (with the swivel arm) and the CX (reverse kingpin style). Both pump and carver like a surfboard, you can check out more info on our website; carverskateboards.com.

I would like to know if the difference between the carver 30″ Eggbeater Complete CX and the C7 is the truck. Or what are the differences between them?

The CX is a bit snappier, lighter but pumps very well. The C7 is a bit flowier, heavier but more adjustable and also pumps very well. So the performance difference is really about a snappy pump (CX) like a shortboard quad surfboard or a flowy pump (C7) like a short retro single fin.

I have a deck that is 29″ long and drilled for 17″ wheelbase, will the CX truck set effectively shorten my wheelbase? What is the typical size wheel you guys use on a complete board like the 30″ eggbeater? 65mm 70mm?

The CX does not shorten or lengthen the wheelbase. All trucks have their own slight variation on wheelbase. Generally it’s measured from the center of the mounting holes to the center of the axle. Here are the wheelbase specs for each of our trucks for future reference. As a comparison I’ve also included Indy and Randal:

CX – Dead Center
C7 – 3/8″ Longer
C2 – 3/4″ Longer
CV – 1/4″ Shorter
Indy – 7/16″ Shorter
Randal – Dead Center

I recently purchased a set of carver CX trucks from your website. After purchasing them I’ve done a little research in my excitement/anticipation. I’m wondering if I should have ordered the C7s. What I’m looking for is a really nice strong speedy pump. Some of the reviews online kinda make me feel like the CX trucks might be more for trick riding and 180s-fakie type stuff. Is there a large noticeable difference in the pumping(speed created from pumping) between the C7s and the CX trucks? I’m looking to really enjoy the surfiness of my board and might do a little sliding/tricks. Thanks a bunch in advanced for any help!

Our new CX.4 is so much snappier and fast pumping than our previous CX.3 that the old reviews don’t do it justice. As a surfer I’m most interested in the pump too, and I’ve been riding my CXs way more than my C7s.

I think you’ll be very happy with the new CX, rest assured. Let me know once you get it what you think.

I’ve got the C7 tucks mounted on my Taylor Knox deck.I love this trucks, actually I am using them for pool and halfpipe too, but I don’t like its heavy weight and the fact that you can’t ride them fakie. That’s why I’d like to know if I can generate the same speed if I change them for your new CX trucks, and the difference between the CX3 and the CX4.

Thanks for your stoke!

Yes, you can generate speed in the same way with the new CX.4 truck. It’s almost unbelievable how snappy they are! And they are indeed lighter and easier to ride fakie, although because of the geometry that allows for all that pump they are still a bit squirrelly going fakie. Its not like a regular truck riding fakie, more like halfway between a C7 and a Randal. You can also use a tighter bushing set in the CX.4 for pools which makes it even easier while still keeping some of the surf feel.

The differences between the CX3 and the CX4:

The 4 is taller, more pumpy and has a precision machined pin, the 3 is our older version, a bit stiffer and lower with less pump. We made the new version so it had the most surf like feeling ever in a regular bushing truck.

I’m trying to decide on whether to get this board with C7 or CX trucks. I am a surfer and have been using a skateboard for cross training and fun on flatter surfaces and would like to cruise along the seawall at Narragansett, RI. I like the groove that August was in during your video, but am enticed by the drive of the newer trucks as I would like to be able to go up mild inclines without kicking. I would like to explore bowls and ramps, but am not likely to be doing areals as a middle aged man.

The C7 is a bit more flowy and a bit more adjustable, but it’s also a bit heavier and does not go reverse as easily. The CX is a bit more snappy but not as adjustable but it’s lighter and goes reverse a bit easier.

For bowls and ramps I’d suggest getting a double kick deck like our Fraktal, similar wheelbase as the Swallow but with a nose kick for better park foot positioning. I’m 51 and have only been riding the new CX since it came out, it’s just a great truck.

I’m from Brazil and I’m looking for a good carver! I’d like the best one for speed. Can u help me?

Are you a surfer or downhill longboard racer?

Surfer! A friend of mine told me about the carvers, so I never had any experience. From what I saw, C7 is better than CX, right?

Cool. When you said speed not many surfers ask about that, they ask about cutbacks, pumping and surf stuff like that. How fast do you want to go? Generally longer boards handle speed better, so faster = longer. But as a surfer you’ll want a board that pumps and snaps too.

If you’re riding hills you can use the 36 Pintail C7 for medium speed hills and flowing pumping, or the 38″ Facetime or 42″ Hotdogger for fast runs. You won’t want to go as fast as cutaway downhill skaters, you’d need stiffer trucks.

The C7 is better for faster runs, as it is more stable at speeds and more easily tightened as well. The CX is like a snappy shortboard, great for pumping a driveway or skatepark.

CV DROP UP TRUCK

I’m considering ordering the Chopsicle. Can you please tell me what trucks the complete comes with? Also, viagra usa if I just buy the deck can I put the C7 on it? Lastly, tadalafil is there a danger in putting the C7 on another brand of cut-away board (I kind of want a shorter one).

The Chopsicle comes with the CV Drop Up trucks, you can read about them here:

http://carverskateboards.myshopify.com/collections/trucks/products/carver-cv-drop-up

The C7 is not designed to be a drop-up or drop-thru truck, so it would need to be top-mounted, and with one riser. Same with the rear C2 back truck that comes with the C7 set. Given that, the whole cutaway, lowered function of the Chopsicle (or any other cutaway deck) is lost. In fact, the style of riding with the C7 on a shorter board is better if you can stand over the trucks, which is difficult when the board is cut away and the wheels are exposed. If you want to ride a C7 truck I’d recommend looking at one of the Surfskate series:

http://carverskateboards.myshopify.com/collections/surfskate

Given all this, if you still want a cutaway style of board for surfskating (with either C7 or CX), I’d say that the best one would be the Loaded Poke, which they already offer with the CX truck set.

CX MINI TRUCK

boardI recently bought this Carver board at a pawn shop and I love it. I’m 43 and have not skated since the mid-eighties, generic cialis but this board has changed that situation. I was reading on your website about the CX mini trucks and I’m wondering how they would go on this spare deck I have that a friend gave me. Would the regular CX truck work as well? 

Thanks for writing in.

I love that you got your board from a pawn shop! Having your work traded on the used market is a great compliment, and I’m stoked it fell into such appreciative hands (or feet, really…)

The CX minis do seem to be a good fit for this size board, as they are not as extremely carvy as the C7 or the new CX.4, which for such a short board is a good thing. It will feel different than the C7, but you will also be able to pump it for speed. If you’re looking for a good wheel for that board I’d recommend our Roundhouse 65 mm Aqua wheels, a good size and feel for this type of board, and they come with the Truck Kit, along with all the other stuff you need to complete your Z-flex.

REPAIRS

How do I maintain my Carver C7 truck?

We grease the bearings and internal Spring at the factory so everything moves smoothly, generic viagra but over time and exposure to the elements the lubrication needs some refreshing. You can completely disassemble your truck with any standard skate tool to re-grease the top and bottom Thrust Bearings as well as the internal Spring. This will keep the action smooth and quiet. We have more tips at: http://www.carverskateboards.com/techinfo/c7.php

I hope I am directing my inquiry to the right address, viagra canada but I am hoping to get some input on whether or not I should ride my Da Monsta in the rain. I live in Vancouver where it pours almost daily and I use the board to commute between classes. Are there measures I can take to ensure the boards longevity or should I save it for dry days?

Thank you for reaching out to us!  You can ride your board in the rain, but there will be effects over time. You can dry the deck when you get back, but it is a piece of wood and so will absorb some of that moisture, and when the deck goes from cold and wet outdoors to warm and dry indoors, there is a strong tendency to for the deck to warp.

The next part that’s vulnerable to water are the wheel bearings, which can seize up in a week if left to rust. Cleaning them can be a chore, as you have to remove the shields and use compressed air to dry them and then lube them right away. You could upgrade to stainless or ceramic bearings to avoid this.

And finally if you have the CX truck set ride in the rain. But if you have the C7 there is a set of thrust bearings in the arm that can also rust if not dried off. We pack them with a marine grease so they withstand normal moisture exposure, but for rain riding I’d dry them out after a run. We have replacement bearings online if you ever need a new set.

All that said, I have a board that I ride when it’s wet, and it’s a blast once you get the feel of the slippery road. It becomes very wake-skatey. I just don’t care it’s a bit twisted and the paint is peeling a bit.

SAFETY

Hi my name is Jim. I am 50 and have a paralysed right arm. However I have been Longboard surfing for 30 years Neil, viagra usa I have a question regarding pads. Two nights ago I hit a stone on the road and I flew in the air and broke my fall with my hand. My bicep took the brunt and is getting better, but the arm is in too much pain to bend. Are the longer boards safer with rocks, ie. stopping suddenly? I can now continuously carve, very powerfully on the Facetime. I’m getting better at pumping, and your boards are too addictive to give up, so I’m going for full protection, including padded shorts and learn to fall on the beach. Thanks for a great product!

Sorry to hear you met the ground, glad to hear it’s not a bad one and you’re on the mend. Rocks are a hazard that are best met with sharp eyes and constant vigilance. Bigger wheels can help a little, but they also make your board taller (you need more risers) and harder to push (as your bent leg has to bend more during pushing).

And of course there’s learning how to fall. I’m okay at it, and even though I fall infrequently (I skate within my limits and mostly under 20mph) I still eat it now and then. Just last week I was testing out a new weird little drainage channel and hit one of those little road gravel rocks and I slammed onto the cement before I was ready for a good reaction. Usually I’m more aware of the ground, sometimes even starting out with a few push ups on it to feel my own weigh, roll onto it to make friends, feeling the act of falling gently on purpose. Usually wakes me up pretty good and reminds me how hard it is, and how I want to avoid it!

When you’re paying attention and not going too fast you can actually do a quick hop off the board, even one-footed during a push, and land into a few running steps, catching yourself. At worst you kind of embrace the ground as you either roll (slower) or slide (faster). Trying to avoid a fall extends your arm out in protection, which is different than reaching out to just slow your fall and give it some direction, followed by tucking into a roll. Taking the fall with intent lessens fear and gives a slight measure of control over it.

Protection always lessens the bite, from elbow and knee pads to gloves and a helmet, and increases your sense of security. Wrist guards have not worked well for me, as they are slippery on the palms, which causes my hand to slide out and strain my shoulder instead. Maybe gloves? Who knows, you can over-pad too, and feel encumbered, so find what level of padding works with your skating.

The most important thing is to know what you can most successfully bail from and respect that limit. Let that limit grow naturally, sometimes over years. There’s plenty of fun in the technique of travel under 20mph!

Sounds like you’re in a great place in life.

A friend says when going slow, he’d only go for padded gloves and an elbow pad on my good arm, that I lead with (editor’s note; Jim is paralyzed in one arm), and forget the helmet. Do you think that’s crazy advice? I notice in the videos, no one wears protection. I have landed 3 times whilst hardly moving and flown once, so I’ll be keeping the speed down. For sure my hand (the only one that works) takes the force, my hip always (I can sew in a pad) and my ankles. But a bang on the elbow would be tooo much, so that’s a certainty. But if I’m only cruising around town, would you recommend a helmet and knee pads?

The issue of whether to wear protective equipment is a very personal one. As a maker of sports gear I’m kind of obligated to advise you to wear protection, as there is always that rare case where things go wrong that some form of protection could have mitigated.

For my own personal decisions regarding protection I mostly skate with a tee shirt, long pants and shoes, though sometimes I skate barefoot in board shorts. Is that crazy? It’s totally my personal decision, and I take that risk with the experience of 35 years of skating, and with a very conservative riding approach nowadays. I mostly just skate around the neighborhood pumping up and down driveway banks practicing my cutback style for surfing, maybe pushing to the beach to check the surf. If I do skate a park I’ll wear a helmet, as the terrain is more prone to causing backwards falls.

But given your arm limitation it does seem a good idea to protect that elbow and leading hip at the very least. Beyond that its up to your best judgement.

TUNE UP TIPS

How do I adjust my C7 front truck?

The first thing to notice is that there are several extra bolts on the C7. DO NOT ADJUST THE FRONT PIVOT BOLT! This is the bearing for the swing arm and it wants to be snug but not too tight, generic viagra as you can overtighten this bolt and damage the bearings inside. The way to adjust the internal spring which controls the arm tension is with the 1/2” Spring Bolt located on the baseplate at the back of the truck. It’s the same size as the wheel nut, whereas the Pivot Bolt is the same size as the Kingpin, 9/16”. You can adjust the Kingpin Nut as well, and this will change rail stiffness. Tightening the Kingpin Nut will stiffen the rail-to-rail action and also reduce wheelbite, while loosening the Kingpin Nut will soften the rail-to-rail action.

How much does adjusting the C2 back truck change the board’s performance?

Adjusting the C2 is a big factor in adjusting the feel of your board, as it is the other half of the system. A looser back truck will probably feel more harmonious with the front C7 or CX, as these are very loose trucks as well. This is good for easy pumping and tight turning. If you are looking for more stability, tightening the C2 back truck will affect the overall feel dramatically and make it much easier to push. As a factory setting we generally prefer the tighter setting for the C7 Kingpin, medium to loose setting for the C7 Spring and loose setting for the C2 back truck Kingpin. This is optimal for surfskate performance, which favors easy pumping and tight turning.

I just bought a pair of the CX trucks but am dismayed at the kingpin hanger height relationship. The kingpin is taller than the hanger (or lower than the hanger if your riding the board). Please note I don’t pretend to understand all that you guys must deal with in getting these trucks to do what they do, but couldn’t help while researching to note the open bushing cup area, and expect the CX to allow more clearance between the top of the hanger and the kingpin.

I’ve been riding the C7 for about 2 years and just recently started riding it in parks (I get loads of comments). As I worked into grinds with the C7, I was always nervous about the kingpin grinding simultaneously with the hanger (mine are loose enough that the kingpin nut is about the same height as the hanger) and thought the CX would solve this.

So, I can’t hide my disappointment, even wondered if somehow I had received a truck with the wrong kingpin (even though I don’t know how a shorter kingpin would accommodate the bushings)?

See attached photos of the newly grinded C7 truck along with the kingpin/hanger height disparity on the CX truck. Any comments or solutions are welcome. I plan to start grinding on the CX but am even more nervous than I was with the C7.

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Thanks for writing in with your question. Stoked you’re having fun in the bowl!

Yes, you know we did a lot of work to get the CX to have that fast pump, and part of that comes from the taller bushing set. We made the new CX so it had the best pump possible for hardcore surfers, and that ended up raising the kingpin. Now, for your application in the bowl you are apparently tightening the bushings a bit more and exposing some threads on the kingpin, which means you could have a slightly shorter kingpin. And if you wanted it even shorter you could use a shorter top bushing, which would restrict the range a bit, but still okay in the bowl.

I’m not sure if you have any tools to modify your kingpin (by grinding or belt sanding it down a bit, or pressing in a new shorter kingpin) and if you do that’s great, let me know how it works. If you don’t, we can help you out by sending you one we modified here, let me know what you prefer.

Either way we can work this issue out and get you grinding with confidence!

Thanks for your response and willingness to help out. I took the kingpin and simply flipped it upside down in the truck (this eliminated any need to grind the kingpin down), then replaced the top bushing with one a bit shorter. I haven’t yet tried it, but it looks good. Thanks again for your help!

That’s great, I’m stoked you have a solution that looks really good. Since we have a thinner bolt head than standard 3/8″ bolts it probably works even better.

Let me know how you like it once you’ve had a chance to ride it.

WHEELS

How many risers should I put on my skate if decide to use 75mm wheels?

Depending on the wheel width and offset, cialis usa anywhere from 3 to 5. Sometimes you need to experiment.

Can you send a photo of the truck model you have as well as the wheel in question? I’ll be able to answer better.

My truck is c7 and the wheels are orangatang durian 75mm.

The Durian has a 45 mm contact patch which is similar in width to our Roundhouse so it’s not too wide, cialis sales but the offset does increase the truck width and the tendency to bite.

If you have 3 risers on your board now I’d suggest experimenting with 4 or 5. Since everyone rides differently it’s best if you approach this as a test and try 4 first, then if you get bite go to 5 to be sure.